Google Ads

Google Ads is the name of Google’s flagship advertising programme. Businesses choose keywords that most closely match their product or service, then create brief adverts that appear whenever those keywords are used in a search.

Google Ads is the name of Google’s flagship advertising programme.

Businesses choose keywords that most closely match their product or service, then create brief adverts that appear whenever those keywords are used in a search. As any number of companies could want the same word for their own campaigns, Google compels businesses to bid against others for the keywords they want. 

More about Google Ads

The bid sets the maximum cost-per-click (CPC) amount you’re willing to pay whenever someone clicks your ad. A higher CPC bid can push the advert to a higher position on the page. 

In pure marketing terms, more budget tends to equal more prominence, and increases the likelihood your Google Ad will be seen by a potential customer.

We say ‘tends to’ because bid-size is only one of the factors that determine the placement of a Google Ad. Google applies a quality score to decide when, where, and how frequently an ad will be shown. It analyses how relevant the advert and landing page are to the end user, as well as the ad’s clickthrough rate.

When Google decides that a Google search and a Google Ad are well-matched, the advert appears at the top of the first search engine return page (SERP). 

Ads can appear under a small ‘Sponsored’ heading as image boxes pointing to websites that sell those products, or as short text advertisements similar to the look and feel of organic search results – though with ‘Ad’ appearing in a small green box to the left of the site URL.

When choosing keywords for a Google Ad campaign different matching options can be selected. The most important of these are:

  • A Broad Match that displays your ad whenever your keyword is searched for – potentially using up the campaign’s CPC budget very quickly.
  • A Negative Match that stops the ad from displaying when a specified word or phrase is searched for.
  • A Phrase Match which requires the use of an exact keyword phrase before the ad will be displayed .
  • An Exact Match that displays your ad exclusively for an exact phrase.

A company’s budget for Google Ads can be allocated for a variety of factors, such as frequency or capping the number if clickthroughs in a given time period. Advertisers can also target by demographic segments, content topics, language and geography. 

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